Home>News Articles>Agricultural News in Asia in 2016>FFTC supports the 2016 symposium on indigenous bees
 April 15 2016

Early this year, FFTC co-sponsored the conduct of the “Apimondia 2016 Symposium: Exhibits and Workshops on Indigenous Bees.” The said symposium, which was held in Tagaytay City, Philippines, provided a forum for bee researchers, policymakers, farmers, and beekeepers around the world to discuss topics related to bees and pollination, and to share their beekeeping practices and experiences. Aside from the monetary support, the Center also sent three bee experts from Taiwan to participate in the said event.

FFTC Agricultural Specialist and entomologist Dr. Wantien Tsai headed the Taiwan delegation and delivered a presentation entitled “Alternative Pollinators for Protected Cultivation of Horticultural Crops in Taiwan.” The other two experts were Dr. Mei-Chun Lu, Chief of Dahu branch, Miaoli District Agricultural Research and Extension Station, Council of Agriculture, Executive Yuan, who delivered a presentation on “Current Status and Future Perspectives of Apiculture Industry in Taiwan” and Dr. En-Cheng Yang, Professor & Chairman of Department of Entomology, National Taiwan University, who talked about the “Neuroethological Studies on the Sublethal effects of Imidacloprid to Honey Bee.”

The three-day symposium and workshop on Indigenous Bees was participated in by 230 participants from 16 countries. The first two days consisted of delivery of 40 Scientific Papers with topics ranging from bee pollination, bee ecology, genetics and physiology, standardization of honey and beekeeping practices, beekeeping for rural development; apitheraphy, bee pest and diseases, beekeeping technology and quality, and bee and pesticides. The third day, on the other hand, was devoted to the workshop proper where technologies on propagation of stingless bees from coconut shell, transferring of wild colonies to hive, processing of honey, pollen and propolis (of stingless bees), etc. were demonstrated at the Makiling Botanical Garden, University of the Philippines Los Baños. In the course of the discussion on issues regarding beekeeping and the development of the bee industry, the participants came up with the following resolutions:

  • Countries in the tropics are rich in bee diversity. It is necessary to protect and conserve native bee species through bee pasture development, regulating the entry of exotic bee species which are likely vectors of pests and diseases and minimizing use of pesticides that are harmful to the bees;
  • Best Beekeeping Practices should be known to all beekeepers in order to produce bee products that are safe to human health without harming the bees and the environment;
  • The standards for honey making should be crafted and implemented to serve as basis for local and international requirements for honey. Honeys and other bee products should be protected from adulteration.
  • Pollination initiatives should be organized amongst Asian nations.
  • Research and extension activities on native bee species and other pollinators should be sustained.

The Symposium and Workshop on Indigenous Bees was held last February 1-4, 2016 at Tagaytay City, Philippines. FFTC co-sponsored the said event.

Two-hundred thirty (230) participants representing 16 countries attended the Bee Symposium.

Three experts from Taiwan attended and delivered scientific papers in the symposium. (From L to R) FFTC’s Agricultural Specialist and entomologist Dr. Wantien Tsai, Dr. Mei-Chun Lu, Chief of Dahu branch, Miaoli District Agricultural Research and Extension Station, Council of Agriculture, Executive Yuan, and Dr. En-Cheng Yang, Professor & Chairman of Department of Entomology, National Taiwan University.

Professor Cleofas Cervancia (lady in red shirt) headed the technology demonstration on stingless bees during the practical workshop held at the Makiling Botanical Garden, Los Baños, Laguna